Classes

Catalog Course Descriptions | Degree Requirements | Independent Study Form | Internship Guidelines

NEW MEXICAN FILM NOIR

Intercession course, January 3-13, 2017

MA330.012 (58959) & IFDM 491.012 (58960)

This course examines classic Film Noir, Hollywood’s “dark cinema” of the 1940s and ‘50s with its bleak view of the world, ambiguous morality, and the mise en scène to match. However, while the typical noir film is set in rain-soaked streets of cities like Los Angeles or New York, during this intercession, we will focus on noir New Mexico: movies set in places like Santa Fe, Roswell, Albuquerque, Taos, and Grants. Students will view and analyze this series of films produced during the post-WWII period to determine how the landscapes of desert, borderlands, and Western towns played host to aspirations of escape from what one critic has described as “the obverse of the American Dream.”

Dates for this two-week, three credit, course are January 3 to 6, and 9 to 13, from 12:30 to 5:00pm each day, MTWRF. Students will be expected to view two films over the break in preparation for day one of class. In-class reading exercises, short essays, and group projects will supplement a final paper. Contact instructor Angela Beauchamp, abqbeach@unm.edu, with any questions.

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TECHNICAL INTRO TO VIDEO

  • MA 111.003 (CRN 33109)
  • Jessie Lenderman
  • Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00am to 1:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88
  • MA 111.002 (CRN 11972)
  • Daniel Galassini
  • Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00am to 1:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88
  • MA 111.636 (CRN 51246) – This section is only available as part of the Freshman Learning Community.
  • Jessie Lenderman
  • Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9:00 to 10:45am
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88

Through a hands-on approach, you’ll learn the technical and operational foundations of video production equipment and procedures, becoming knowledgeable about the responsibilities and techniques of individual production. This studio course will take you through the phases of production from pre- through post-production. You’ll gain awareness of the creative potential of motion pictures (including video and film) as art. Focusing on narrative and non-narrative vocabularies, we will explore the art of moving images as you develop your own work with in-class critiques, exercises, and projects. This course is a prerequisite for further courses in production.

 

INTRO TO FILM STUDIES

  • MA 210.001 (CRN 11974)
  • Dr. Stephanie Becker
  • Tuesdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63
  • MA 210.002 (CRN 57980)
  • Dr. Becky Peterson
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • Hartung 100, Special Fee $63

An overview of a century of film history and study, this course will feature a broad range of film types (narrative, experimental, documentary), as well as a range of approaches to understanding the aesthetic and cultural significance of the medium. “Introduction to Film” is a required course for Cinematic Arts majors and minors; it is also a prerequisite to production courses at the 200-level and above, and to courses in history, criticism, and theory at the 300-level and above.

 

BEYOND HOLLYWOOD: Cinema of Childhood

  • MA 212.003 (CRN 42335)
  • Dr. Adán Ávalos
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

This course concentrates on the representation of children and adolescents in world cinema. The portrayal of children throughout world cinema has a long and rich history, which has been primarily shaped by family and national structures. Through film screenings, readings, and discussions, the class will center on the exploration of what it means to look at children and what cultural baggage their bodies are asked to carry. Also, what impact do national and global politics have on the lives of children? Through the establishment and use of basic vocabulary and analytical methodologies of film studies, larger theoretical and practical questions about how cinema functions as a cultural and ideological force—especially how it helps to construct ideas about the family, the nation, and national identities—will be addressed. “Beyond Hollywood” is a required course for majors.

 

INTRO TO MOVING IMAGE ART

  • MA 216.001 (CRN 46729)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Thursdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $123

According to artist Jean Cocteau, “film and video will only become a true art form when their tools are as inexpensive as pencil and paper.” The low cost of new digital equipment suggests that only now—eighty years after his prophetic statement—are we beginning to realize Cocteau’s dream. This introductory course will be structured as a creative laboratory where students will explore a variety of aesthetic and theoretical issues relating to new media technology and the creative process. Students will learn basic digital production and post-production skills through a range of collaborative and individual projects and exercises.

 

INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING

  • MA 324.003 (CRN 12169)
  • Matthew McDuffie
  • Tuesdays, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

An in-depth workshop on the basics of character, structure, scenes, dialogue, conflict, visualization, and good old story telling as it applies to the screenplay format. Open to variations (including Television, Graphic Novels, Documentary). We’ll read scenes from scripts, watch film clips, and write at least forty pages of an original screenplay. Prerequisite: ENG 224 or permission of instructor.

 

HISTORY OF FILM I: THE SILENT ERA

  • MA 326.002/*426.002 (CRN 35746 and 35747)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

A study of major fiction, documentary, and experimental films from around the world in relation to prominent artistic, social, and political concerns of the silent era (approximately 1890 -1930). Films from the US, France, England, Germany, the former USSR, and Japan are included in this historical survey. MA 426 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CELLULOID BUDDHAS, MONKS with MOVIE CAMERAS, and THE TRUE DELIGHTS OF ZEN NOIR

  • MA 330.001/*430.001 (CRN 49777 and 49778)
  • Dr. Susan Dever
  • 3 Fridays per month, 11:30am to 6:00 pm. 3 units (up to 6 credits, with lab).
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Anticipate the “poignant, often hilarious” films of a “cell-phone toting, soccer-obsessed monk who makes casting decisions with ancient divination systems.” Investigate the darkly comedic, noir-ish precincts of a zendo (and watch yourself doing so). Wring popular culture’s objects to see how Scorsese sees the Dalai Lama, how Tibet constructs Shangri-La. Consider the art and politics of Tibetan cultures in the digital age. Reflect on monks’ favorite movies and movie stars’ favorite monks.

We’ll think about what it means to pay attention to films that ask us to think about paying attention—and then, as we read, write, make and critique art together, we’ll practice paying attention. We’ll cultivate mindfulness and awareness of our global citizenship rather radically, with secular meditation and contemplation practices, hands-on arts exercises, field trips, guest artists and scholars, and finally by analyzing some truly moving, moving-images.

“Celluloid Buddhas” offers an opportunity to puzzle out what it means to be an artist, writer, thinker, maker, human . . . in the context of some of today’s most challenging conditions. We’ll work with the “cinema” of our own lives—the often-dramatic expressions of our minds—and glimpse contemplative minds, that, even in dire circumstances, have mastered what the Dalai Lama calls “the art of happiness.” There are no special prereq’s, no dogma, nothing to “believe” . . . and yet everything to try on for size. The course is open to anyone willing to slow down and take a look at his or her own mind.

Student projects will reflect diverse interests and distinct presentation formats. We’ll invite artists and art historians to produce companion art (or scholarship); students of American culture, for example, might focus work on Hollywood’s “virtual Tibet.” Group or independent projects will encourage students of philosophy, psychology, cultural studies, religious studies, Asian studies, studio art, science, peace studies, cinematic arts, and beyond to bring knowledge and skill to our transdisciplinary studio-seminar. There will be short breaks, plus mealtime, so bring your sack lunch (we’ve a fridge), a spirit of adventure, and your sense of humor. MA 330 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CELLULOID BUDDHAS: PROJECT “LAB”

  • MA 497.001/597.001 (CRN 12345 and 12393)
  • Email Dr. Susan Dever, susandev@unm.edu, for permission to enroll
  • Fridays (one Friday per month, depending on “Celluloid Buddhas” schedule). 2 – 3 credits
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

This term we’re offering students (who are now—or have been previously—enrolled in “Celluloid Buddhas” or “EveryDay Art”) an opportunity to deepen interests and thus earn two to three additional units. The Lab component is designed for those pursuing a wide range of creative projects associated with the practices introduced in the contemplative cinemas courses. Your work will culminate in a brief presentation to the class at the end of the term. The material you create may extend an indy project you are already developing for “EveryDay Art,” or you may opt to open another area of creative investigation. Whatever mode you select will determine presentation formats and dates.

Are you working on a film that you hope to finish by this term’s end? Another art project you aspire to enhance? Music? Writing—from the essay, or fictional work, to poetry? A reading list that you’ll complete and annotate? A science project?

In the lab, we’ll view (or hear) your works in progress. Our meetings will provide a structure where we can, in collaboration, note your progress and offer you some general questions and practical pointers at each step of the way. We’ll also shape your efforts into a succinct form that can be presented to the larger group. We will meet monthly in the Studio (Room 365) on three Friday afternoons when the larger group is not in class. You must commit to coming to the lab, since attendance at each session is essential. Previous or co-enrollment in “Celluloid Buddhas” or “EveryDay Art” is a firm co-requisite for this two- to three-credit opportunity.

 

CURRENT TRENDS IN MOVING IMAGE ART

  • MA 330.002/*430.002 (CRN 52950 and 49779)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Wednesdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Moving image art represents profound artifacts of human activity that are both expressions of radical imagination and barometers of the human condition. This course will survey a wide range of un-dependent media focusing on artistic practice in the context of historic, cultural and political concerns. The various histories of moving image art raise important issues concerning the limits and possibilities of what a movie might be. The politics of voice, representation, and cultural ownership are central concepts that we will explore. The course will consist of screenings, readings, discussions, and lectures. Students will be evaluated through written assignments, exams, and class participation. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CURRENT TRENDS PRODUCTION LAB

  • MA 496.005 (CRN 52956)
  • Email Bryan Konefsky, bryank@unm.edu, for permission to enroll

In this independent production lab, students will create short films that respond to cinematic practices studied in the Current Trends in Moving Image Art class. Students who take this independent study course are required to enroll in MA 330/430 (Current Trends). Instructor permission is required to register for the lab.

 

MEXICAN CINEMA

  • MA 330.003/*430.003 (CRN 56507 and 56508)
  • Dr. Adán Ávalos
  • Tuesdays, 9:00am to 12:15pm
  • Hartung 100, Special Fee $63

This survey course concentrates on the Mexican national cinema’s three major internationally acclaimed periods (Golden Age 1935-1955, New Wave 1970-1978, Globalized New Wave 1992-2004). We will be focusing specifically on particular cinematic moments and movements that have been critically recognized for their aesthetic, historical, political, and social explorations. While surveying a wide body of work, attention will be placed on individual films and filmmakers, and their role in innovative film practices whose methods are still in use. Through the establishment and use of basic vocabulary and analytical methodologies of film studies, larger theoretical and practical questions about how cinema functions as a cultural and ideological force—especially how it helps to construct ideas about the nation and national identities—will be addressed. Class screenings will cover a breadth of Mexican national cinema but readings, discussions, and outside film viewings will provide a more comprehensive overall picture. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

THE CINEMATIC WORLDS OF MICHAEL JACKSON

  • MA 330.004/*430.005 (CRN 56510 and 56511)
  • Nina Fonoroff
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

From his early years as a child star on the Chitlin’ Circuit and at Motown Records, through the concert rehearsal documentary This is It (released  shortly after his death in 2009), Michael Jackson left a rich legacy of recorded music, televised performances, and short film (a description he preferred to “music video”).

This course provides a look at Jackson’s body of artistic work as key to his vast influence on popular culture over the past 50 years, with an emphasis on the short films he created over the course of his career——from 1980s works like “Thriller,” “Billie Jean,” and “Bad,” through the films for his “Dangerous” and “HIStory” albums in the 1990s, and beyond. As part of our study, we’ll also listen to his music, view his concert footage and TV appearances (including some rare interviews) and explore the few feature films in which he appeared as an actor/singer/dancer (The Wiz, Moonwalker). We’ll read from a growing body of scholarly writing on Jackson’s cultural significance, noting the ways he drew from earlier stage and screen traditions—including nineteenth-century minstrelsy, the choreography of Fred Astaire and other dance/cinema innovators, and the art of soul legends like James Brown and Jackie Wilson—to craft a performance style uniquely his own. Crucially, we will ask how Jackson’s shifting public persona worked to destabilize categories of gender, sexuality, and race, in a manner that was very different from his contemporaries: notably, the recently-deceased David Bowie and Prince.

Elevated to superstardom and then made an object of the voracious cultural appetite for scandal, Michael Jackson is now increasingly regarded as a singularly influential figure in the history of popular music and culture. We will ask how his innovations in songwriting, singing, dance, costume design, and staging for short music-and-dance films reflected and transformed some of the central preoccupations of U.S. and international popular culture across his 40-year career, and into the present. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

THE CINEMATIC WORLDS OF MICHAEL JACKSON LAB/WORKSHOP

  • MA 496.002 (CRN 12327)
  • Email Nina Fonoroff, NFonoroff@aol.com, for permission to enroll

In this independent production lab, students will create short films that respond to the content from The Cinematic Worlds of Michael Jackson class. Students who take this independent study course are required to enroll in MA 330/430 (Michael Jackson). Instructor permission is required to register for the lab.

 

THE PRACTICE OF LOOKING

  • MA 330.005/*430.007 (CRN 56959 and 56961)
  • Dr. Susan Dever
  • Tuesdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

If “time is creativity’s precursor,” as our College maintains, what happens during “time”? What do we do before we pick up our cameras or computers? Working hypothesis for this new course: Genuine art/scholarship comes of clicking to the moment and inhabiting it. Through the practice of looking at our minds via secular meditation, we’ll see how mindfulness/awareness arises. The goal of this studio/seminar is to enhance our ability to synchronize living with art-making and its enjoyment, grooming our perception and analytic skills to do so. Class will be about grappling with expressive stillness and silent abiding, investigating the relationship of “making” to quiescence. Without any sort of dogma—and always with humor and respect for our shared human condition—we’ll practice glimpsing the “awake” state, inherent in all of us. Ultimately, the in(ter)dependent work we create though the course may open us to the larger world though present-tense engagement with our minds, movies, and a variety of “museums.” This class is in the style of “EveryDay Art,” with selected field trips and guests. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

POST-APOCALYPTIC CINEMA

  • MA 330.008/*430.004 (CRN 55519 and 51987)
  • Angela Beauchamp
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

Zombies, plagues, nuclear destruction … nightmares of a catastrophic future are all the rage in recent cinema. To understand this intense cultural interest in post-apocalyptic worlds, we will examine the traumas and anxieties that influence these visions of impending dread. What happens after the end of the world is usually not about death of the species, but about beginning again and rebuilding civilization–sometimes envisioning new possibilities without the racial, class, generational, and gender inequities of the present, but quite often a brutal return to patriarchal order. We will look at the atomic panic films of the 1950s, imagining nuclear winter in the 1980s, and fears of terrorism, pandemics, and environmental disaster that often take the shape of the undead. We’ll experience apes who rule the earth, everyday cannibalism, the biblical “end of times,” women valued only for their reproductive capabilities, and many other horrors, while also figuring out what it is that we value most as humans.

 

FILM THEORY

  • MA 331.001/*431.001 (CRN 38969 and 38970)
  • Dr. Adán Ávalos
  • Tuesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Students will explore major concepts in film theory and criticism through comparative analysis of critical essays and films of diverse styles. We will read and discuss the ideas of historical and contemporary theorists as they pertain to a variety of films screened in class. Themes will include cinematic realism, montage editing, the development of narrative, documentary, new media, animation, gaming, and avant-garde theories and practices in cinema; plus psychoanalytic, feminist, queer, phenomenological, and multicultural readings of films. What defines cinema as a unique art form? What elements connect films with our notions of reality? How do ideologies come to be inscribed in films? How does film resemble a language? These are among the questions that we will address. This course will provide the background for further studies in media history/theory, film and video making, and cultural studies. “Film Theory” MA 431 is a required course for majors. MA 431 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

TEEN REBELS

  • MA 334.001/*434.001 (CRN 56516 and 56517)
  • Dr. James Stone
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

This course explores movies from the US and the UK whose youthful main characters challenge convention and authority. We will study the cultural, social, and historical forces that shaped the lives of young people in the 1960s, ‘70s, and ‘80s. MA 434 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

ADVANCED SCREENWRITING

  • MA 390.001 (CRN 36135)
  • Matthew McDuffie
  • Thursdays, 5:00pm to 8:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

This is a continuation of the introductory course. Emphasis will be on developing story ideas, dramatic conflict, sequencing, and scene work. Intense workshops will lead to a completed 120-page screenplay. Prerequisite: MA 324 or permission of instructor.

 

16MM FILMMAKING

  • MA 391.001 (CRN 46728)
  • Nina Fonoroff
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $148

Students will be introduced to pre-production planning through the final edit, and will become familiar with both the practical and aesthetic challenges of making short films. Class sessions will include critiques of student work, technical demonstrations, screening of short films made by a variety of artists, and the planning and execution of a class project. Among the topics that are covered in the class are camerawork, lighting, film stocks and exposure, sound recording, editing techniques, and preparing the film for the lab. Students will be responsible for purchasing the majority of their own materials for the course; 16mm production costs usually run approximately $500 to $600 for the semester.

 

ADVANCED VIDEO ART (Hybrid course)

  • MA *409.002 (CRN 57524)
  • Email Deborah Fort, debfilms@unm.edu, for permission to enroll
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm and online
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

This class helps students to develop more complex artistic statements on video and other forms of digital media. The class will include critiques of student work, plus readings and discussions about various arts and media. Students will design individual or small group projects that challenge technical skills and expand personal understanding of the moving image arts. Half of the class will be presented online, requiring students to actively organize their own engagement with class activities. Students in this class must be highly motivated and able to work independently. Students must have technical skills sufficient to allow them to plan, shoot and edit short video projects. MA 409 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department. Instructor permission required.

 

DIGITAL POST PRODUCTION

  • MA *429.001 (CRN 52953)
  • Deborah Fort
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

Digital Post Production is designed to facilitate the expansion of the student’s awareness of the editing process, and to develop skills as an editor. We will explore a wide range of films in order to better understand what makes them work in terms of editing. Students will also develop a level of competence with the tools necessary to effectively practice the art of the editor. There are numerous programs being used by professional editors today. We will be working with Adobe Premiere as our primary editing platform and Avid Media Composer as our secondary editing platform.

We will also be using Adobe After Effects for compositing, and animation, Speed Grade for color correction, Adobe Media Encoder for compression and Adobe Audition for sound. We will use Adobe Photoshop (or Gimp) for developing graphic elements, and prepping materials for use in After Effects.

The essentials of visual aesthetics, editing theory, and post-production management will be addressed with all projects. Students will apply their skills in a variety of exercises and projects. There are no specific class prerequisites for this class, though students will need a basic understanding of editing on both the technical and theoretical levels, and have the independence and maturity necessary for success in this class. MA 429 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

NEW MEXICO FILMMAKING REDUX

  • MA *429.004 (CRN 49776)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Mondays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

Since the earliest days of cinema (in 1898 Thomas Edison shot one of his “actualities” in Albuquerque titled Isleta Indian Day School) New Mexico has played an important role in the history of cinematic storytelling. In this course, students will revisit this celluloid history, the films that were shot in the state and, most importantly, the legendary locations where these films were made. To this end, students will spend the semester considering the metaphoric wake left behind at various –now mythological – New Mexico locations where films were shot. Students will travel to these sites, explore how these locations resonate with the half-life of their “moment in the sun,” and create video-responses to their findings. MA 429 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

CINEMA OF CHARLIE CHAPLIN

  • MA 330.001/*430.001 (CRN 25727, 25735)
  • Dr. James Stone
  • Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Charlie Chaplin was a comic genius. Celebrated the world over, his “Little Tramp” remains an instantly recognizable cinematic icon.

Chaplin’s art was intimately related to his life and times. We will screen and discuss his most important (and funniest!) works, making sure to place them within a biographical and historical context. His life was extraordinarily dramatic. Born into a family wracked by poverty, mental illness, and alcoholism, he grew up to be the most famous person in the world. Acclaimed for his unsurpassed skills as a physical comedian, he was also persecuted by anti-Communist forces, hounded by a scandal-hungry press, and driven out of the United States for his political beliefs.

His cinema moves seamlessly between moments of frenetic slapstick, sublime choreography, life-and-death struggle, passionate courtship, and heartbreaking loss. Chaplin made art that runs the gamut of human experience. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • MA *429.001 (CRN 25744)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

This course prepares students interested in cinematography by introducing essential techniques in motion picture camerawork. While the class will survey a variety of mediums, cameras, and processes, this course will focus on the development of a personal vision and understanding of the fundamentals of cinematic art: movement, light, and time. Coursework will involve weekly assignments that study both natural and studio lighting, as well as mobile and still framing. Critique, in-class workshops, and the occasional film screening will constitute the majority of class time. MA 429 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

TECHNICAL INTRO TO VIDEO

  • MA 111.001 (CRN 11970)
  • Jessie Lenderman
  • Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:15am to 1:30pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88
  • MA 111.002 (CRN 11972)
  • Deborah Fort
  • Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00am to 1:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88

Through a hands-on approach, you’ll learn the technical and operational foundations of video production equipment and procedures, becoming knowledgeable about the responsibilities and techniques of individual production. This studio course will take you through the phases of production from pre- through post-production. You’ll gain awareness of the creative potential of motion pictures (including video and film) as art. Focusing on narrative and non-narrative vocabularies, we will explore the art of moving images as you develop your own work with in-class critiques, exercises, and projects. This course is a prerequisite for further courses in production.

 

INTRO TO FILM STUDIES

  • MA 210.001 (CRN 11974)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Tuesdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63
  • MA 210.002 (CRN 56244)
  • Dr. Becky Peterson
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

An overview of a century of film history and study, this course will feature a broad range of film types (narrative, experimental, documentary), as well as a range of approaches to understanding the aesthetic and cultural significance of the medium. “Introduction to Film” is a required course for Cinematic Arts majors and minors; it is also a prerequisite to production courses at the 200-level and above, and to courses in history, criticism, and theory at the 300-level and above.

 

BEYOND HOLLYWOOD: Cinema of Childhood

  • MA 212.003 (CRN 51821)
  • Dr. Adán Ávalos
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

This course concentrates on the representation of children and adolescents in world cinema. The portrayal of children throughout world cinema has a long and rich complex history, which has been primarily shaped by family and national structures. Through film screenings, readings, and discussions, class will center on the exploration of what it means to look at children and what cultural baggage are their bodies asked to carry. Also, what impact do national and global politics have on the lives of children? Through the establishment and use of basic vocabulary and analytics methodologies of film studies, larger theoretical and practical questions about how cinema functions as a cultural and ideological force, especially how it helps to construct ideas about the family, the nation, and national identities will be addressed. “Beyond Hollywood” is a required course for majors.

 

INTRO TO MOVING IMAGE ART

  • MA 216.001 (CRN 31562)
  • James Roy
  • Thursdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $123

According to artist Jean Cocteau, “film and video will only become a true art form when their tools are as inexpensive as pencil and paper.” The low cost of new digital equipment suggests that only now—eighty years after his prophetic statement—are we beginning to realize Cocteau’s dream. This introductory course will be structured as a creative laboratory where students will explore a variety of aesthetic and theoretical issues relating to new media technology and the creative process. Students will learn basic digital production and post-production skills through a range of collaborative and individual projects and exercises. Prerequisite: MA 111 and 210 or permission of instructor.

 

INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING

  • MA 324.003 (CRN 12169)
  • Matthew McDuffie
  • Tuesdays, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

An in-depth workshop on the basics of character, structure, scenes, dialogue, conflict, visualization, and good old story telling as it applies to the screenplay format. Open to variations (including Television, Graphic Novels, Documentary). We’ll read scenes from scripts, watch film clips, and write at least forty pages of an original screenplay. Prerequisite: ENG 224 or permission of instructor.

 

HISTORY OF FILM II: THE SOUND ERA

  • MA 326.001/*426.002 (CRN 46107 and 46108)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

A study of major fiction, documentary, and experimental films from around the world in relation to prominent artistic, social, and political concerns of the silent era (approximately 1890 -1930). Films from the US, France, England, Germany, the former USSR, and Japan are included in this historical survey. “History of Film” is a required course for majors.  MA 426 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

EVERYDAY ART

  • MA 330.002/*430.001 (CRN 48845 and 48844)
  • (repeated for credit MA *430.002 [CRN 48846]; write instructor for permission)
  • Dr Susan Dever
  • 3 Fridays per month, 11:30am to 6:00 pm. 3 units (up to 6 credits, with lab).
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Everyday, adjective. Ordinary, routine, common . . . brilliantly what is Every day, adverb. Daily, habitually, steadfastly . . . with much delight in discipline EveryDay Art, an adjectival noun adverb (or some such thing, surely). e.g., a good cup of tea made mindfully each morning; a symphony composed on paper napkins

This is a course about cultivating art-making as a daily habit, a way of seeing, being, taking in, and responding to our world. With Tibetan Buddhist artist Chögyam Trungpa’s True Perception, plus the work of other Buddhist arts exemplars, accompanied by a range of profoundly moving moving-images, we’ll practice the techniques of mindfulness-awareness meditation, quieting our minds so that insight has means, method, and opportunity to arise. Off the cushion and away from our theater seats, we’ll visit sacred and secular sites (an all-faith exploration, from sports arenas to churches) to help us further experience elements that constitute the seeds of our in(ter)dependent studies. Individual or group projects may range from screenplays, critical essays, photography portfolios, scholarly investigations, cinematic novellas, scientific projects, to other quotidian and other evanescent pleasures. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

EVERYDAY ART: PROJECT “LAB”

  • MA 497.002/597.002 (CRN 27673 and 27677)
  • Email Dr. Susan Dever for permission to enroll
  • Fridays (one Friday per month, depending on “EveryDay Art” schedule). 2 – 3 credits
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

This term we’re offering students (who are now—or have been previously—enrolled in “Celluloid Buddhas” or “EveryDay Art”) an opportunity to deepen interests and thus earn two to three additional units. The Lab component is designed for those pursuing a wide range of creative projects associated with the practices introduced in the contemplative cinemas courses. Your work will culminate in a brief presentation to the class at the end of the term. The material you create may extend an indy project you are already developing for “EveryDay Art,” or you may opt to open another area of creative investigation. Whatever mode you select will determine presentation formats and dates.

Are you working on a film that you hope to finish by this term’s end? Another art project you aspire to enhance? Music? Writing—from the essay, or fictional work, to poetry? A reading list that you’ll complete and annotate? A science project?

In the lab, we’ll view (or hear) your works in progress. Our meetings will provide a structure where we can, in collaboration, note your progress and offer you some general questions and practical pointers at each step of the way. We’ll also shape your efforts into a succinct form that can be presented to the larger group.

We will meet monthly in the Studio (Room 365) on three Friday afternoons when the larger group is not in class. You must commit to coming to the lab, since attendance at each session is essential. Previous or co-enrollment in “Celluloid Buddhas” or “EveryDay Art” is a firm co-requisite for this two- to three-credit opportunity.

 

FILMS OF ALMODOVAR

  • MA 330.003/*430.003 (CRN 55257 and 55259)
  • Dr. Stephanie Becker
  • Saturdays, 10:00am to 1:30pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

“Films of Pedro Almodóvar” will review one of the most successful and controversial Spanish filmmakers since Luis Buñuel. From the early 1980s, his films have explored and expressed the joys and contradictions of a generation suddenly freed from a dictatorship that was not only politically but also socially and sexually repressive. Almodóvar took full advantage of this explosion of freedom of expression creating a unique body of work that has captured the world’s admiring attention. Through readings and discussion, we will seek to understand and appreciate his films within the context of Spanish and world cinema. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CULT FILM

  • MA 330.004/*430.009 (CRN 55258 and 28153)
  • Teresa Cutler-Broyles
  • Fridays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Pink Flamingoes. Eraserhead. A Clockwork Orange. These and other cult films are iconic in American Cinema. In this class we will ask just what makes a film “cult.” Is it content, context, participation, production value, a combination of them all? Or is it something less easy to define? Through screenings of iconic cult from the 1970s and 1980s, as well as newer films, and by looking at TV shows considered cult by many loyal viewers, we will explore these and other questions. Readings will include film and cultural theorists. There will be no exams; student responsibilities will include response papers and two larger papers throughout the semester, as well as readings and class discussion. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

I DRIVE, THEREFORE I AM: CAR CULTURE AND THE SPEED OF LIGHT

  • MA 330.005/*430.009 (CRN 30995 and 28153)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Wednesdays, 1:45 to 5:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

“I think that cars today are almost the exact equivalent of the great Gothic cathedrals. (They are) the supreme creation of an era, conceived with passion…and consumed in image if not in usage by a whole population which appropriates them as a purely magical object.” – Roland Barthes, Paris, 1957

From flat heads to big blocks, the Model T to Ford’s Super Duty, the automobile has played an important role in the history of cinema and, as Roland Barthes suggests, shaping our cultural sense of self. This course will explore, study, deconstruct, and “unpack” a selection of cinematic incarnations of the automobile as both magical object and cultural icon. MA 330/430 will consist of screenings, readings, discussions, lectures, and a field trip to the Albuquerque Dragway. Students will be evaluated through written assignments, exams, and class participation. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CAR CULTURE PRODUCTION LAB

  • MA 496.004 (CRN 27928)
  • Email Bryan Konefsky for permission to enroll

In this independent production lab, students will create short films that respond to cinematic history studied in the Car Culture class. Students who take this independent study course are required to enroll in MA 330/430 (Car Culture). Instructor permission is required to register for the lab.

 

MUSICALS

  • MA 330.007/*430.007 (CRN 51822 and 50749)
  • Nina Fonoroff
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

We will look at the colorful history of the American musical, a genre of films that often engage spectators’ pleasure through their irresistible song-and-dance spectacles rather than their intricate narratives. In these films, cinematography, choreography, words, acting, and music all work together (often in vibrant color), to tell simple stories about complex cultural identities and aspirations. How do films like Oklahoma, Meet Me in St. Louis, and West Side Story paint the divisions between the urban streets and small-town idylls? What about the “show-within-a-show” subgenre (as in Busby Berkeley’s classic dance sequences in 42nd Street, the 1953 classic Singin’ in the Rain, or the more recent Dreamgirls?) We’ll consider how ideas of race, ethnicity, gender, and class are embedded in these films, powerfully demonstrating a process of ideal “Americanization” through song and dance; and, as counterpoint to these narratives of assimilation, we’ll also consider queer viewings/readings. Also, since many Hollywood musicals began their lives as stage productions (notably on Broadway), we’ll look at some intersections between the theatrical and cinematic experiences that have made up these stories, for the creators and their audiences. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

AVANT-GARDE FILM HISTORY

  • MA 330.008/*430.008 (CRN 51823 and 51824)
  • Nina Fonoroff
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

Since the beginning of film, many artists have worked outside of the boundaries of institutionalized “cinema” to explore new perceptual frontiers. This course looks at some major trends within a movement that has variously been called Experimental, Avant-Garde, and Underground Filmmaking. These works often venture into formal abstraction, dream states, alternate sexualities, and fractured narratives. As we view films that meld the seemingly distinct categories of experimental, documentary, and narrative film, we can embrace our sense of the unexpected. While moved by very different creative impulses, these artists are united by a need to enjoy the kind of artistic liberty that can occur when one makes moving images and sound outside the heavily-capitalized film industries. We’ll note the ways some pivotal art and literary movements like Dadaism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and “Beat” poetics have influenced the film artists we study. This can lead us to consider some distinctions between “pop culture” and “high art” (and also to ask whether these distinctions even remain useful). Viewing this body of work and reading a series of articles will prompt students to write short critical papers, while also keeping a visual journal for the duration of the semester. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

AVANT-GARDE FILM LAB/WORKSHOP

  • MA 496.007 (CRN 31001)
  • Email Nina Fonoroff for permission to enroll

In this independent production lab, students will create short films that respond to cinematic history studied in the Avant-Garde Film History class. Students who take this independent study course are required to enroll in MA 330/430 (Avant-Garde). Instructor permission is required to register for the lab.

 

THE MIND’S EYE: MOVIES + MEDITATION

  • MA 330.012/*430.012 (CRN 56326 and 56327)
  • Dr. Susan Dever
  • Tuesdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Whether we make art or enjoy it, whether we consider ourselves filmmakers or scholars, or whether we find any such distinctions superfluous to the fine arts of being and perceiving, we all “see” our world from multiple perspectives. In addition to bringing all sorts of experiences to the fruition of our arts relationships, we also bring both brain and mind to the anticipatory moment—that time before something is created, before the five senses, firing away, engage the work.

To get anywhere near those senses—generally underemployed by today’s “smart brains”— we’ll first develop our mind’s eye by quieting its interruptive thought bubbles. We’ll learn to catch and release classics from “Assignment’s due; haven’t started; stupid idea” to “Producing a masterwork; they’ll love it; I’ll be famous.” With ease and judicious humor, we’ll take a look at ourselves as makers and viewers, to then more playfully envision what it is we could see into becoming.

Through the practice of secular sitting meditation, we’ll develop mindfulness and awareness of ourselves and our environments, using as objects of meditation everything from the breath to the moving image. Quite literally visualizing our art and scholarship before we commit to their instantiation, then using the mind’s eye to shape the work, and finally, sensually taking in the finished product, we’ll sharpen our ability to interact with the phenomenal world.

A rich congeries of artists, philosophers, neuroscientists, and film theorists will excite our appreciation of movies that spark sense perceptions. On offer for this latest course in Contemplative Cinema are films about perception, as well as perceptively beautiful films. As are all the classes in this Series, there’s no dogma, nothing to “believe,” no special skills required for enrollment. What matters most is your willingness to experiment with the precursor of art and its appreciation: your mind’s eye. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

FILM THEORY

  • MA 331.001/*431.001 (CRN 41496 and 41498)
  • Dr. Adán Ávalos
  • Tuesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Students will explore major concepts in film theory and criticism through comparative analysis of critical essays and films of diverse styles. We will read and discuss the ideas of historical and contemporary theorists as they pertain to a variety of films screened in class. Themes will include cinematic realism, montage editing, the development of narrative, documentary, new media, animation, gaming, and avant-garde theories and practices in cinema; plus psychoanalytic, feminist, queer, phenomenological, and multicultural readings of films. What defines cinema as a unique art form? What elements connect films with our notions of reality? How do ideologies come to be inscribed in films? How does film resemble a language? These are among the questions that we will address. This course will provide the background for further studies in media history/theory, film and video making, and cultural studies. MA 431 “Film Theory” is a required course for majors. MA 431 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

INTERNATIONAL HORROR

  • MA 335.001/*435.001 (CRN 53671 and 53672)
  • Dr. James Stone
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

A survey of the horror film genre from its origins in silent films through its contemporary instances, this course asks what it is that horror, as a genre, studies. Among monsters of various kinds, fabulous distortions of the human, what fundamental aspects of human existence and culture are revealed? What do we learn about dreams, suspense, fear, and fantasy? What is it about us that delights in being horrified? MA 435 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

IMAGES OF (WO)MEN

  • MA 336.001/*436.001 (CRN 55261 and 55262)
  • Angie Beauchamp
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63
  • Crosslisted with WMST 379.007

This course is an introduction to feminist and queer film studies, with a focus on cinematic representations that address “women,” while questioning the unity of this category. We will cover a wide range of genres, styles, historical periods, and cinemas, exploring constructions of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation in the context of film theory, queer theory, and critical race studies. This includes discussions of representation, identification, reception, resistant viewing practices, the male gaze, queer and transgender gazes, gender performativity, heteronormativity, homonormativity, post-feminism, censorship, and cinematic conventions and their defiance. Selected films include Hollywood, independent, and international productions.

Please be aware that this course is Rated R, with adult content. The “R” rating means that registration is limited to those with junior standing or above, as the movies screened will sometimes present images or language that some may find challenging or offensive. MA 436 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

ADVANCED SCREENWRITING

  • MA 390.001 (CRN 36135)
  • Matthew McDuffie
  • Thursdays, 5:00pm to 8:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

This is a continuation of the introductory course. Emphasis will be on developing story ideas, dramatic conflict, sequencing, and scene work. Intense workshops will lead to a completed 120-page screenplay. Prerequisite: MA 324 or permission of instructor.

 

FINAL CUT PRO WORKSHOP –2H, second half of the semester, 1 credit

  • MA 429.001 (CRN 33140)
  • Wednesdays, 9:00 to 11:00am
  • Daniel Galassini
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98
  • MA 429.002 (CRN 33141)
  • Wednesdays, 2:00 to 4:00pm
  • Daniel Galassini
  • CERIA 360, Special Fee $98

This one-credit workshop will introduce students to basic techniques of video editing in Final Cut Pro software for the Macintosh. Instruction will include logging and capturing of video clips, file management on Firewire hard drives, arranging video and audio clips on the timeline, video and audio transitions, and advanced editing techniques. This course is highly recommended for students enrolled in Cinematic Arts studio courses under the MA 216 number.

 

EXPERIMENTS IN CINEMA

  • MA *429.004 (CRN 51825)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Mondays, 1:45 to 5:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

“Experiments in Cinema” is a collaboration between the Department of Cinematic Arts and Basement Films (a community based, non-profit organization, whose mission is to support underrepresented forms of media). In this experiential learning course, students will produce a six-day, experimental film/video festival that will be presented at venues across the city. Additionally, students will be involved in producing our Youth Outreach Program and hands-on filmmaking workshops. Collectively, we will craft our eleventh annual festival from an international pool of submissions, produce a printed program, secure publicity and funding, develop press release material, and brainstorm the future of this event as a community-based festival and Cinematic Arts course. Guest speakers will introduce students to the world of grant writing and discuss New Mexico’s investment in the moving image arts. Students will be evaluated through written assignments, class participation, and the production of a video document about this year’s festival. MA 429 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

DOCUMENTARY FILM PRODUCTION

  • MA *429.005 (CRN 50321)
  • Deborah Fort
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98
  • Crosslisted with IFDM 491.003

Students in this hands-on video workshop will be introduced to the tools and methods of video making in the genre of “creative nonfiction.” Students will explore a variety of approaches to developing documentary video projects in the current technologically rich culture. The class will study methods of interviewing, as well as the use of conversation, narration, historical texts and images, reenactments and other expressive uses of image and sound, toward the goal of producing a nonfiction video essay. Students will become acquainted with the challenges and rewards of individual and collaborative projects. Class sessions will emphasize technical skill development, understanding of creative process, understanding the documentary form and critique of work. To better understand the form, we will also screen a wide range of films by documentary media artists. MA 429 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

COURSES CROSSLISTED FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS:

53887-MA 330 001 Social Transformation Film

52690-MA 330 009 Visualizing Global Change (2H)

55489-MA 330 010 A Cinematic Tour de France

55495-MA 330 011 Race, Class & American Film

56263-MA 429 003 Bio Art and Design

 

TECHNICAL INTRO TO VIDEO

  • MA 111.002 (CRN 11972)
  • Deborah Fort
  • Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00am to 1:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88
  • MA 111.003 (CRN 33109)
  • Jessie Lenderman
  • Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00am to 1:15pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88
  • MA 111.636 (CRN 51246) – This section is only available as part of the Freshman Learning Community.
  • Jessie Lenderman
  • Tuesdays & Thursdays, 9:30 to 10:45am
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $88

Through a hands-on approach, you’ll learn the technical and operational foundations of video production equipment and procedures, becoming knowledgeable about the responsibilities and techniques of individual production. This studio course will take you through the phases of production from pre- through post-production. You’ll gain awareness of the creative potential of motion pictures (including video and film) as art. Focusing on narrative and non-narrative vocabularies, we will explore the art of moving images as you develop your own work with in-class critiques, exercises, and projects. This course is a prerequisite for further courses in production.

 

INTRO TO FILM STUDIES

  • MA 210.001 (CRN 11974)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Tuesdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63
  • MA 210.003 (CRN 49008)
  • Becky Peterson
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63
  • MA 210.648 (CRN 51233) – This section is only available as part of the Freshman Learning Community
  • Teresa Cutler-Broyles
  • Thursdays, 2:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

An overview of a century of film history and study, this course will feature a broad range of film types (narrative, experimental, documentary), as well as a range of approaches to understanding the aesthetic and cultural significance of the medium. “Introduction to Film” is a required course for Cinematic Arts majors and minors; it is also a prerequisite to production courses at the 200-level and above, and to courses in history, criticism, and theory at the 300-level and above.

 

BEYOND HOLLYWOOD: Cinema of Childhood

  • MA 212.003 (CRN 42335)
  • Adán Ávalos
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

This course concentrates on the representation of children and adolescents in world cinema. The portrayal of children throughout world cinema has a long and rich complex history, which has been primarily shaped by family and national structures. Through film screenings, readings, and discussions, class will center on the exploration of what it means to look at children and what cultural baggage are their bodies asked to carry. Also, what impact do national and global politics have on the lives of children? Through the establishment and use of basic vocabulary and analytics methodologies of film studies, larger theoretical and practical questions about how cinema functions as a cultural and ideological force, especially how it helps to construct ideas about the family, the nation, and national identities will be addressed. “Beyond Hollywood” is a required course for majors. Prerequisite: MA 210 or permission of instructor.

 

INTRO TO MOVING IMAGE ART

  • MA 216.001 (CRN 46729)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Wednesdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $123
  • MA 216.002 (CRN 29516)
  • James Roy
  • Saturdays, 10:00am to 1:30pm
  • Dane Smith 231 and CERIA 365, Special Fee $123

According to artist Jean Cocteau, “film and video will only become a true art form when their tools are as inexpensive as pencil and paper.” The low cost of new digital equipment suggests that only now—eighty years after his prophetic statement—are we beginning to realize Cocteau’s dream. This introductory course will be structured as a creative laboratory where students will explore a variety of aesthetic and theoretical issues relating to new media technology and the creative process. Students will learn basic digital production and post-production skills through a range of collaborative and individual projects and exercises. Prerequisite: MA 111 and 210 or permission of instructor.

 

LATIN AMERICAN FILM

  • MA 310.001/410.001 (CRN 51985 and 52126)
  • Stephanie Becker
  • Saturdays, 10:00am to 1:30pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

“Latin American Film” surveys cinema from Mexico’s influential “Golden Age,” Post-Revolutionary movies, moving through Cuban “New Cinema” of the ’60s and ’70s to recent productions from the island, then examining continent-wide contemporary works, continuing to focus on the cinema of rebellion. Here we look at examples of filmmaking from Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Chile, discussing the significance of citizenship represented in films about national and local police states. Cinematic constructions of the “national character” will be juxtaposed with examinations of a “raced” and “gendered” citizenry. All films will be accessible to English speakers (though students may submit work in either Spanish or English). MA 410 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING

  • MA 324.003 (CRN 12169)
  • Matthew McDuffie
  • Tuesdays, 6:00pm – 9:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

An in-depth workshop on the basics of character, structure, scenes, dialogue, conflict, visualization, and good old story telling as it applies to the screenplay format. Open to variations (including Television, Graphic Novels, Documentary). We’ll read scenes from scripts, watch film clips, and write at least forty pages of an original screenplay. Prerequisite: ENG 224 or permission of instructor.

 

HISTORY OF FILM I: THE SILENT ERA

  • MA 326.002/426.002 (CRN 35746 and 35747)
  • Peter Lisignoli
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

A study of major fiction, documentary, and experimental films from around the world in relation to prominent artistic, social, and political concerns of the silent era (approximately 1890 -1930). Films from the US, France, England, Germany, the former USSR, and Japan are included in this historical survey. “History of Film” is a required course for majors. Prerequisite: MA 210 or permission of instructor. MA 426 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

CELLULOID BUDDHAS, MONKS with MOVIE CAMERAS, and THE TRUE DELIGHTS OF ZEN NOIR

  • MA 330.001/*430.001 (CRN 49777and 49778)
  • Susan Dever + Nina Fonoroff
  • 3 Fridays per month, 11:30am to 6:00 pm. 3 units (up to 6 credits, with lab).
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Anticipate the “poignant, often hilarious” films of a “cell-phone toting, soccer-obsessed monk who makes casting decisions with ancient divination systems.” Investigate the darkly comedic, noir-ish precincts of a zendo (and watch yourself doing so). Wring popular culture’s objects to see how Scorsese sees the Dalai Lama, how Tibet constructs Shangri-La. Consider the art and politics of Tibetan cultures in the digital age. Reflect on monks’ favorite movies and movie stars’ favorite monks.

We’ll think about what it means to pay attention to films that ask us to think about paying attention—and then, as we read, write, make and critique art together, we’ll practice paying attention. We’ll cultivate mindfulness and awareness of our global citizenship rather radically, with secular meditation and contemplation practices, hands-on arts exercises, field trips, guest artists and scholars, and finally by analyzing some truly moving, moving-images.

“Celluloid Buddhas” offers an opportunity to puzzle out what it means to be an artist, writer, thinker, maker, human . . . in the context of some of today’s most challenging conditions. We’ll work with the “cinema” of our own lives—the often-dramatic expressions of our minds—and glimpse contemplative minds, that, even in dire circumstances, have mastered what the Dalai Lama calls “the art of happiness.” There are no special prereq’s, no dogma, nothing to “believe” . . . and yet everything to try on for size. The course is open to anyone willing to slow down and take a look at his or her own mind.

Student projects will reflect diverse interests and distinct presentation formats. We’ll invite artists and art historians to produce companion art (or scholarship); students of American culture, for example, might focus work on Hollywood’s “virtual Tibet.” Group or independent projects will encourage students of philosophy, psychology, cultural studies, religious studies, Asian studies, studio art, science, peace studies, cinematic arts, and beyond to bring knowledge and skill to our transdisciplinary studio-seminar. There will be short breaks, plus mealtime, so bring your sack lunch (we’ve a fridge), a spirit of adventure, and your sense of humor.

 

CELLULOID BUDDHAS: PROJECT “LAB”

  • MA 497.002/597.002; (write Professor Nina Fonoroff for permission to enroll)
  • Nina Fonoroff
  • Fridays (one Friday per month, depending on “Celluloid Buddhas” schedule). 2 – 3 credits
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

This term we’re offering students (who are now—or have been previously—enrolled in “Celluloid Buddhas” or “EveryDay Art”) an opportunity to deepen interests and thus earn two to three additional units. The Lab component is designed for those pursuing a wide range of creative projects associated with the practices introduced in the contemplative cinemas courses. Your work will culminate in a brief presentation to the class at the end of the term. The material you create may extend an indy project you are already developing for “Celluloid Buddhas,” or you may opt to open another area of creative investigation. Whatever mode you select will determine presentation formats and dates.

Are you working on a film that you hope to finish by this term’s end? Another art project you aspire to enhance? Music? Writing—from the essay, or fictional work, to poetry? A reading list that you’ll complete and annotate? A science project?

In the lab, we’ll view (or hear) your works in progress. Our meetings will provide a structure where we can, in collaboration, note your progress and offer you some general questions and practical pointers at each step of the way. We’ll also shape your efforts into a succinct form that can be presented to the larger group.

We will meet monthly in the Studio (Room 365) on three Friday afternoons when the larger group is not in class. You must commit to coming to the lab, since attendance at each session is essential. Previous or co-enrollment in “Celluloid Buddhas” or “EveryDay Art” is a firm co-requisite for this two- to three-credit opportunity.

 

CURRENT TRENDS IN MOVING IMAGE ART

  • MA 330.002/430.002 (CRN 52950 and 49779)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Tuesdays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Moving image art represent profound artifacts of human activity that are both expressions of radical imagination and barometers of the human condition. This course will survey a wide range of un-dependent media focusing on artistic practice in the context of historic, cultural and political concerns. The various histories of moving image art raise important issues concerning the limits and possibilities of what a movie might be. The politics of voice, representation, and cultural ownership are central concepts that we will explore. The course will consist of screenings, readings, discussions, and lectures. Students will be evaluated through written assignments, exams, and class participation. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

SCIENCE FICTION II – Cancelled

  • MA 330.003/*430.003 (CRN 36896 and 38228)
  • Caroline Hinkley
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

This course, by way of the Science Fiction Film genre, will explore speculative geographies of new spatial and temporal forms, new and imagined landscapes and architecture reflective of disaster politics and late capitalism, historical threats of Cold War “enemies” and recent immanent forms of the “war on terror,” biological warfare, and inferred alien invasions. Themes that will emerge are those emanating from films that are intrinsically intertwined with “real” science, philosophy, and psychoanalysis, i.e. inner space. We will further examine how cinematic space and landscape, urban space in particular, reflect and inform each other. We will likewise emerge with an understanding of the prominent historical influences on the genre such as postmodernism, feminism, German Expressionism, Queer Theory, Orientalism, and Cyberpunk. Prerequisite: MA 210 or permission of instructor. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department. MAY BE TAKEN BY THOSE CURRENTLY IN SCIENCE FICTION I.

 

FILM NOIR

  • MA 330.008/430.004 (CRN 55519 and 51987)
  • Angie Beauchamp
  • Thursdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

This course examines Hollywood “dark cinema” of the 1940s and early 1950s that often deals with crime, corruption, and disillusionment in the city. Students examine questions regarding race, class, gender, and sexual orientation within the series of films produced during the post-war period to determine how these films imagined a universe that one critic has described as representing “the obverse of the ‘American Dream.’” Our investigation of noir crime thrillers, detective films, psychological melodramas, and the so-called noir “woman’s picture” will be informed by film theory and criticism. Prerequisite: MA 210 or permission of instructor. MA 430 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

FILM THEORY

  • MA 331.001/*431.001 (CRN 38969 and 38970)
  • Adán Ávalos
  • Tuesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Students will explore major concepts in film theory and criticism through comparative analysis of critical essays and films of diverse styles. We will read and discuss the ideas of historical and contemporary theorists as they pertain to a variety of films screened in class. Themes will include cinematic realism, montage editing, the development of narrative, documentary, new media, animation, gaming, and avant-garde theories and practices in cinema; plus psychoanalytic, feminist, queer, phenomenological, and multicultural readings of films. What defines cinema as a unique art form? What elements connect films with our notions of reality? How do ideologies come to be inscribed in films? How does film resemble a language? These are among the questions that we will address. This course will provide the background for further studies in media history/theory, film and video making, and cultural studies. “Film Theory” is a required course for majors. Prerequisite: MA 210 or permission of instructor. MA 431 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

ALFRED HITCHCOCK

  • MA 337.001/*437.001 (CRN 52952 and 52955)
  • James Stone
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00 pm
  • CTRART-2018, Special Fee $63

This course will explore the nature of suspense in relation to surprise and shock. In making such distinctions, we will look at various genres to see how Hitchcock represents and transcends them. The director’s approach to sexuality, gender, and nationality will also be explored. Our central goal is to arrive at some idea of what constitutes the distinctiveness of Hitchcock’s cinema. Prerequisite: MA 210 or permission of instructor. MA 437 may be taken for graduate credit with approval from your home department.

 

ADVANCED SCREENWRITING

  • MA 390.001 (CRN 36135)
  • Matthew McDuffie
  • Thursdays, 5:00pm to 8:00pm
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $63

This is a continuation of the introductory course. Emphasis will be on developing story ideas, dramatic conflict, sequencing, and scene work. Intense workshops will lead to a completed 120-page screenplay. Prerequisite: MA 324 or permission of instructor.

 

16MM FILMMAKING

  • MA 391.001 (CRN 46728)
  • Nina Fonoroff
  • Mondays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $148

This course introduces basic 16mm filmmaking techniques, with an emphasis on film as a creative art form. Students will be introduced to pre-production planning through the final edit, and will become familiar with both the practical and aesthetic challenges of making short films. Class sessions will include critiques of student work, technical demonstrations, screening of short films made by a variety of artists, and the planning and execution of a class project. Among the topics that are covered in the class are camerawork, lighting, film stocks and exposure, sound recording, editing techniques, and preparing the film for the lab. Students will be responsible for purchasing the majority of their own materials for the course; 16mm production costs usually run approximately $500 to $600 for the semester.

 

DIGITAL POST PRODUCTION

  • MA 429.001 (CRN 52953)
  • Deborah Fort
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 9:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

This course is designed to expand your awareness of the technical and aesthetic aspects of digital post production. Emphasis will be on developing your skills as an editor. This will involve exploring a variety of styles of film and video in order to better understand the editing principles applied in each case. In addition you will develop a certain level of competence with the tools of post production in order to effectively practice the art of the editor. There are several video non-linear editing systems (NLE) used by editors today. Two of the most common are Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere (Final Cut X is also used professionally to a lesser extent. I have chosen not to include it in this class because it is a single platform software). We will working with Premiere as our primary NLE with an introduction to Media Composer. We will also be using After Effects for compositing, and animation, Adobe Audition and Adobe Speed Grade. We’ll undertake a brief introduction to Adobe Photoshop for preparing graphic elements for project use and Edge Animate for HTML5 animation. The essentials of visual aesthetics, editing theory, and post-production management will be addressed with all projects. Students will apply their skills in a variety of exercises and projects. We will be using Learn and Lynda.com extensively so students need to have online access throughout the semester.

 

NEW MEXICO FILMMAKING REDUX

  • MA 429.004 (CRN 49776)
  • Bryan Konefsky
  • Mondays, 1:30 to 5:00pm
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $98

Place ‘N Time: New Mexico and the Movies Redux: Since the earliest days of cinema (in 1898 Thomas Edison shot one of his “actualities” in Albuquerque titled Isleta Indian Day School) New Mexico has played an important role in the history of cinematic storytelling. In this course students will revisit this celluloid history, the films that were shot in the state and, most importantly, the legendary locations where these films were made. To this end students will spend the semester considering the metaphoric wake left behind at various –now mythological – New Mexico locations where films were shot. Students will travel to these sites, explore how these locations resonate with the half-life of their “moment in the sun,” and create video-responses to their findings.

 

FINAL CUT PRO WORKSHOP (TWO 8-WEEK SESSIONS DURING FIRST AND SECOND HALF OF SEMESTER, 1 CREDIT EACH)

  • MA 429.006 (CRN 32504) / MA 429.007 (CRN 32505)
  • Wednesdays, 5:30 to 7:30pm
  • Daniel Galassini
  • CERIA 337, Special Fee $98

This one-credit workshop will introduce students to basic techniques of video editing in Final Cut Pro software for the Macintosh. Instruction will include logging and capturing of video clips, file management on Firewire hard drives, arranging video and audio clips on the timeline, video and audio transitions, and advanced editing techniques. This course is highly recommended for students enrolled in Cinematic Arts studio courses under the MA 216 number.

 

MIND + ART: FIVE SEPTEMBER DAYS

  • MA 330.007/430.007 (CRN 53901 and 53902)
  • Susan Dever
  • This intensive course meets on September 5, 6, 7, 12 and 13 (Saturdays and Sundays + Labor Day) from 10:00am to 6:00pm.
  • CERIA 365, Special Fee $63

Instructor Permission required.